Keeping Loyal Employees

When Bad Managers Lose Good People

Feb 12, 2019


Recruiting good employees is a costly endeavor. Companies invest a lot of time, money and careful attention to hire the right employees for their organization.  What happens when those good employees leave because of a bad manager?

According to a Gallup poll, managers account for at least 70% of an employee’s motivation and well-being.  This means good managers positively impact their employees’ performance and attitude, but the adverse effect of uninvolved and negligent managers can’t be overstated.  From the State of the American Manager report, "Having a bad manager is often a one-two punch: Employees feel miserable while at work, and that misery follows them home, compounding their stress and putting their well-being in peril."

At one time or another, everyone has experienced the sense of dread that accompanies going to work when a bad manager has made a good job feel miserable. Disengaged employees can cost companies millions of dollars from lost productivity, negligence and negative publicity due to poor customer service. Companies know how important it is to have a motivated, engaged workforce, but often fail to hold managers accountable for making employees unhappy.

To keep good employees the company has worked so hard to recruit and hire, it’s vital to deliver on the promise of great management. If you believe that employees are the most valuable asset, you must create a healthy work atmosphere and provide them with the tools and support they need to do their jobs effectively.

According to the Gallup poll, research reveals that about one person in 10 (or 10%) possesses high talent to manage. That means when put in managerial roles, the employee has a strong natural ability to:

  • Put the right people in the right roles;
  • Create a culture of clear accountability;
  • Engage employees with a compelling vision;
  • Motivate every employee individually;
  • Coach and develop their people by focusing on their strengths;
  • Make decisions based on productivity, not politics; and
  • Build trust and dialogue with their people about both work and life outside of work.

Effective people management could be the most difficult aspect of sustaining a thriving enterprise.  But companies that devote more attention to promoting and developing good managers are rewarded with long-lasting, quality staff, and become more attractive to job-seeking professionals.

CHARACTERISTICS OF A GOOD MANAGER:

CONNECTS WITH STAFF. Good managers are present and available to their staff, communicating with them more often than merely when a task needs to be done.  A connected leader will seek to understand the employee as a whole, determining interests, strengths and weaknesses, for the purpose of nurturing those talents, and offering assistance or guidance when needed.

EMPOWERS EMPLOYEES. A successful leader will provide their employees with the proper tools and give them room to get the job done. Recognizing the skill level and value of the employee, the manager need not “micromanage,” but rather will offer support and instruction as needed.  By doing so, this empowers the employee to take the initiative to be better and do better. 

PRACTICES TWO-WAY COMMUNICATION. Good managers prioritize communication within their department.  Whenever possible, they keep employees apprised of changes within the company.  Fresh ideas and suggestions from the staff are met with encouragement, and feedback is examined carefully.  This two-way communication creates a culture of loyalty and trustworthiness, which can result in reduced employee turnover.

ARE FAIR AND NEUTRAL. Good managers treat every employee fairly and with respect. Employees need not fear favoritism under such a leader, knowing that integrity is the governing principle in the office.  A manager like this will be willing to share praise when exceptional teamwork is present, and take responsibility with the department when things don’t go quite as planned.

REWARDS AND RECOGNIZES. Good managers demonstrate value and appreciation to their staff.  Successful work is acknowledged, and improvement is always rewarded.  A strong leader knows that a little recognition can go a long way in employee motivation.

RECOMMENDS EMPLOYEES FOR ADVANCEMENT. Good managers recognize and acknowledge strengths in their employees. As a result, they are often in a unique position to provide senior management with accurate recommendations for advancement. Not only does this build confidence and reward valuable employees, but it also provides ample opportunity for loyalty and longevity to grow in the workplace.

Loyal employees are your most valuable asset. They use your internal tools and systems to interact with customers. As such, they can be your best brand ambassadors, but only insofar as they feel appreciated and valued.  Encourage good managers and champion their example to others.  While it’s true you can't buy loyalty, you can certainly foster and nurture it. Employees who feel vital to the company’s success will always go the extra mile, and will be compelled to take the initiative to solve problems, which will benefit your company is every way.

About Lofton: Founded in 1979, Lofton Services offers clients the best of all worlds. We provide the responsive, personal service and flexibility of a small local firm while having the technology, resources, and infrastructure to deliver the benefits of the biggest players in our industry. Lofton Staffing can deliver the right people, with the right skills, right when you need them. Celebrating 40 years in staffing excellence! Contact us today.   


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We Believe...

Relationships are built…one on one.
Know your people - match interest and talents to the tasks.
Don’t manage by numbers. (They just show if we’re on track.) People do the work.
People should feel better when they leave than when they came – and in turn we feel better.
When we help others, we help ourselves.
Great expectations: fair pay, fair treatment, teach me.
Have fun…and be better.
Work at having fun (51% of the time.) If you don’t feel it, fake it. Having fun is not slacking off. Work is more natural than play.